Boundaries – a fine line

From childhood until university, I used to think that the best way to win and maintain friendships was to let the other person have their own way all the time. I mean, that’s what everyone says about friends; it’s important to put the other person first. As a teenager – with Asperger’s, at that – I was never good at interpreting social rules. Though really, how far wrong can you go with this one?

It started harmlessly enough. If other children had forgotten/broken a pencil, they soon knew they could ask me for one. If we were queueing for anything exciting, I would willingly let anyone who asked go in front of me. And if I had any particularly special treats in my lunch…well, you get the idea.

I think my parents realised there was a problem when I began losing some of my stationery to people who needed it more. But who was I to complain? I was trying to be a good friend. I didn’t always like it, but I wanted to make people happy, and thanks to autism, that was the only way I knew how. My first rule of thumb was to put other people first; my second, to avoid offending anyone. And saying “no” to a reasonable request was, in my mind, the epitome of offense. Especially when people took offense if I so much as thought about it. A problem which I could never get to go away.

It wasn’t until I started trying to apply boundaries that I learned that not having them makes it harder to recognise and respect other people’s boundaries. At first glance this makes no sense – the reason many people struggle to set them is because they desperately want to please. I’ve had to learn to not be either offended or overcome with guilt when people disagree with me, or criticise me, and instead, simply work out how to change for the better. This doesn’t mean blindly deferring to the other person; sometimes it takes a bit of objective analysis of a situation to see what you could do differently.

Unfortunately, it’s impossible to go through life without offending anyone. Until I left uni, I used to think it was as simple as either keeping the peace at all costs, or showing no respect for other people’s feelings whatsoever, but it’s not that black and white. I couldn’t let go of the mindset that being a good friend meant keeping the peace at all costs, until I realised that setting boundaries isn’t unreasonable. For me, it means:

  • Not being afraid to politely but firmly let someone know if you don’t like the way they treat you
  • Being consistent in the standards you set for how you treat other people and expect to be treated
  • Being able to disagree with someone, while still showing them respect
  • Reminding the other person that their way of seeing things isn’t the only way – while remembering this principle yourself

So, to end on a saying I heard at church once, if you never say no, what is your yes worth?

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Dear diary…

“Have just had my toughest experience ever: Mum sitting on me, squeezing my blackheads, with Rhian looking on!”

“Sometimes I wish time wouldn’t drag so, especially after the Easter hols…” 

Is this normal writing for a 13 year old?

My journals and I go back a very long way. Even as a kid, I loved the feeling of having a fresh new notebook, which I could decorate as frivolously as I wanted, before complaining to it about my life. And let’s face it, when you’re a teenager – and an autistic one trying not to be eaten alive by non-autistic ones, at that – there is a lot to complain about.

Actually, my first diary was more of a travel log, three days before I turned 11, just before adolescence became an issue. We were en route to New Zealand, and I was not letting a moment of our upcoming adventure go to waste. Amid jetlag from hell, day trips of a lifetime, and hours of travel by land, sea, and air, I was determined to write down everything we did. I don’t know why I wrote as if I was addressing the rest of my class at school (why the heck would they care how many bedrooms our third motel had?), but that aside, I’m glad I did it.

Since then, my journals have evolved considerably, and have seen me through nearly a decade of teenage angst, followed by my attempts at adulthood. Journaling is my main way of keeping myself writing every few days, and a testament to what a nerd I am is how I feel like I have a different relationship with each one, depending on a number of factors. Like how often I wrote. Or what stage of life I was at. Or how much written self-reflection I did. It makes me feel pretentious, putting it like that, but it’s true.

Through keeping it up, give or take a few slips, I’ve definitely benefitted a lot from journaling. For a start, it helps me remember. I love laughing at my old diaries! It also helps me regulate my thoughts and emotions, making them less overwhelming when I can see them on paper. I’ve written down hard learned life lessons, I’ve made important decisions through brainstorming, I’ve poured out my heart about many a difficult situation, and instantly felt calmer.

Most recently, I’ve come to realise that writing a diary has helped me be more honest with myself, because I can get my thoughts and feeling out without being heard. Or maybe practise getting them out until I’m ready for them to be heard. Sometimes I don’t feel like it, other times I get started and don’t stop for ages. Either way, it feels like a constructive habit, and if it keeps me writing and learning, long may it continue!

My diaries, minus my current one, two pocket notebooks, and a wad of cat shaped post it notes. Starting with my neon travel log, going clockwise, and finishing in the middle.