The neurotypical mask

We all spend a good chunk of our lives putting on a metaphorical mask for the world around us. Relatable, right? You wear an “I’m fine” mask when you are dying inside. Or an “ideal version of me” mask when with people you can’t quite be open with. Or an “I’m in control of my life” mask when you suddenly realise you are an adult…

Or a “neurotypical” mask, as an Asperger person in a world of neurotypicals. That is, non autistic people.

This past week has not been the best. Having got a packaging job the week before, I turned up for day two and was sent home for not working fast enough on day one. Ouch. And it’s at times like this that my neurotypical mask keeps slipping.

Let me explain.

With my mask, I can listen to someone without breaking eye contact to look at everything else I can hear just as clearly. With it, I can laugh at my own mishaps without getting frustrated or embarrassed. I can not react to people I don’t know well touching me unexpectedly. I can go to parties, and have fun while fighting the feeling of being both overcrowded and isolated. I can not only make small talk, but also put new people at ease with my sense of humour. With my mask, I can manage rather a lot.

But when the mask slips, I say the bare minimum to new people. When it slips, I get irrationally angry about any mistake I make, autism related or not. My brain drops my social skills in order to free up the capacity to deal with my current situation. I am slower at understanding sarcasm and jokes, and interpreting instructions. I either avoid social gatherings, or spend the whole time feeling desperately lonely and self conscious when everyone else knows how to bond in a big group. I am very easily confused by too much background noise, or too many people talking at once.

See? The neurotypical mask is a hard mask to hold. In fact, the other day, when I had a panic attack at a social gathering and shut myself in the bathroom for ages, I think it must have fallen off altogether. And when that happens, I can’t face anyone other than – at most – my parents, and I either clam up, or rattle off every scary thought and feeling inside me without even trying to find my mask.

Basically, having a learning difference can be exhausting. We on the spectrum put so much brain power into making sense of the neurotypical world that we are bound to burn out. If this happens over something that “isn’t that hard!”, then either it is that hard for us, or something else has pushed us to that point. I speak for myself when I say I will explain what I need when I can. Neurotypical people, I realise that learning differences aren’t an excuse for every shortcoming, but do try and cut us some slack once in a while.

 

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2 thoughts on “The neurotypical mask

  1. Reblogged this on Laina's Collection – sharing Aspergian/autistic writing and commented:
    So relatable! This is pretty much the story of my offline life out in public. This post is a great read!

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