Objectivist poem: G Major, 3 octaves

For my first theme, this month I will be posting poems I have written on here. I may do the odd Christmas themed post at some point, with or without poetry. For now, I will post my recent attempt at an objectivist poem. An objectivist poem involves writing about something very simple and focusing on the structure of the poem so that it represents something to do with the subject. For example:

I take

My violin

In my left hand.

With my right

I take

The bow

And place it down

On my violin.

 

One

Finger at

A time

Going higher

And higher

Now moving

Into third

Position, stretch

That fourth

Finger, keep

Going higher

To high

G.

As the poem suggests, I wrote about playing my violin. Having mentioned to the lecturer teaching us about objectivist poetry that I play the violin, he and I simultaneously had the idea that that should be the subject for my poem.

To explain, the poem is divided by the different actions and objects. The first verse in particular starts a new line every time the action changes, or an object is mentioned. Then when the scale itself starts, so does the second verse. The second verse, by the way, is based purely on the notation of the first half of a 3 octave G major scale. I chose G simply because of it being my first initial – any note would have worked. One long note at the beginning and end, two notes per bow in between. And some unnecessarily complicated hand movements…and I am digressing.

I’ll be honest – I chose poetry for this month’s theme mainly because I’d planned to blog weekly as part of my course and was still stumped for a theme a week after the last one. In the meantime, if anyone has any constructive feedback on how weird/interesting/profoundly emotional (only joking) this poem is, fire away!

Items published: http://www.derbytelegraph.co.uk/DERBY-tourist-guide/story-25163651-detail/story.html

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s